Hi there! This is my art blog where I put my paintings, sketches and fashion inforgraphics. As you can see, I'm very obsessed with heavily influenced by fashions of the past, 80's &90's Hong Kong cinema, ATLA and folktales.

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Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/

This is a hairstyle timeline that is meant to cover the Taishō era (1912-1926). However the dates for many reference photographs were rather vague, so some might actually fall into Shōwa era (1926-1989). Regrettably I couldn’t cover EVERY single hairstyle from this period so please consider this to be a brief overview. There are no Geisha, Maiko, etc featured here; they will be covered in another fashion timeline someday.

Some interesting notes about Meiji-Taisho era from Liza Crihfield Dalby’s Kimono: Fashioning Culture (1993)

·         “Men and women of Meiji had gulped up Western culture with all the indiscriminate enthusiasm of new converts. By Taishō, Japanese sensibilities vis-à-vis the West were much smoother. This was Japan’s political equivalent of the … social scene of the American Roaring Twenties. Japanese born during Taishō would enter adolescence as modern boys and girls. Significantly, women opened their closets to Western clothing during this decade. Kimono has lost space ever since.” (pg. 124)

·         “By 1915 Japan was beginning to feel itself a world-class nation, more confident of its military strength and social development. Ordinary Japanese were inclined to look at their society in light of how life might be bettered by adapting foreign ideas, or made more interesting by acquiring foreign fashions. Borrowing from the West was of course not new, but it had now become a more reciprocal and respectable process.” (pg. 124)

WOMEN’s HAIR:

·         In the Meiji era “a few women cropped their hair, but these courageous souls were simply regarded as weird” and indecent (pg. 75)

·         “If cutting the hair short was too radical [in Meiji Japan], as public reaction attests, women’s hair did gain a new option in the sokugami style, a pompadour resembling the chignons worn by Charles Dana Gibson’s popular Gibson girls. The further the front section, or ‘eaves,’ of the hair protruded, the more daring the style. The sokugami style bunched the hair, coiling it in a bun at the crown of the head. Unlike traditional coiffures, sokugami did not require the heavy use of pomade, pins, bars, strings, and false hair to hold its shape. Its appeal was promoted as healthier and more rational – hence, more enlightened- than the old ways.” (pg. 75)

A short illustration showing different styles of the Manchurian women’s wing-like headdress through early, mid and late Qing dynasty. When time allows, I’d like to create a much more in-depth version with many more drawings/styles. 


—NOTES—

“Manchu women of position generally decorated their hair with a small comb whose frame was formed with wire or thin rattan strips and covered with black gauze, on which were embroidered green feathers. The commoners mostly wore ‘fork-shape’ buns. Later under the influence of the Han women, they came to wear flat buns. However, the bun became higher and higher towards the end of the dynasty until it was an ornaments of fixed shaped in the form of an ‘archway’, capable of being put on the head at will after putting a few flowers into it, hence the name of ‘big wings’.” (5,000 Years of Chinese Costume, pg. 173)

“Manchu women combed their hair into a flat chignon at the back with horns supported by a hair board, which was also called ‘double horns hair style.’ Very beautiful and unique, they often decorated hair with big flowers of vivid color or tassels.” (Chinese Clothing, 81)

Hairstyles of Tang Dynasty Women

"In early Tang, hair ornaments were rather simple, but during the reign of Emperor Taizong the buns got higher and higher and the number of styles grew." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"During the earlier years of Emperor Xuanzong’s rule, the Tartar hat was fashionable, but in the later years…many women opted for switch buns (also called ‘false buns’). In late Tang and the Five Dynasties, the high buns were often decorated with different kinds of flowers." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

“Ponytails were also quite popular among a small number of aristocratic ladies during the years of Tian Bao (Xuangzong’s reign). (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, pg. 84)


“Common women…preferred the ‘tossing-up bun’, with the hair at the temples embracing the buns were made higher and higher, and were decorated with flowers, which heralded the popularity of the flowery hats of the early Song Dynasty.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, pg. 84 )

 

Makeup

"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"…between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather. Some women painted their cheeks with motifs such as a moon or a coin, and their lips were also rouged.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)

"[The hua dian was] said to have originated in the Southern and Northern Dynasties. […] In the Tang Dynasty, hua dian was either painted or made of tiny metal pieces.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, pg. 86)